Archive for the ‘Pests’ Category

More Katydid Facts

Wednesday, June 13th, 2012

This is a greater arid-land predaceous katydid, neobarrettia spinosa (female).

This is a tough bug; it eats Praying Mantises for breakfast! If you were to harass it with your finger, rather than hopping away, it will charge and CHOMP you, drawing blood!

It has an extra set of arms under it’s chin that it uses to feed it’s mouth with scraps and titbits while it’s dining.

Katydids should die off soon, but look out for the emerging cicadas!

Katydids Invade South Texas Again

Thursday, May 31st, 2012

Katydids are more of a nuisance than a true pest for the general homeowner. Yes they can eat their fair share of leaves and other greens in our gardens, but for the most part, it is minimal and accepted. However on occasion for some growers or individuals who have had enough, control measures can be obtained. Fruit gardeners or other edible crops can control nymphs through the use of insecticides containing spinosad. This product used in accordance with label directions has been proven to be safe for humans, other mammals, and birds. For heavier infestations there are chemical alternatives available.

Katydids are relatively easy to control¬†with the application of chemical pesticides, however the chemicals do not differentiate between beneficial insects and harmful ones. In the process of trying to control them with chemicals , you can create a unbalance in the natural order and have a increase in other pests. Yes you can kill them by the thousands, but millions more are still coming and the annoying noise and debris that they generate will still be there. So sit back on a warm summer evening and enjoy nature’s serenade and realize that not all in our world can be controlled by us.

If you are still determined to try and control them with pesticide application, Hitman Pest Control offers it’s landscape and tree spraying services at competitive rates.

Texas Scorpions

Sunday, February 5th, 2012

Scorpions are arachnids, close relatives of ticks, mites and spiders. Scorpions prefer dryland habitats but they do occur throughout Texas. They can be a nuisance when they interact with humans because they will sting when disturbed.